Spiced Christmas Cake

The festive season is well underway, but I feel like I haven’t had that many sweets. As I’m feeling better after being ill, I’m finally ready for the treats! So I decided to make something festive and full of what Christmas tastes like to me. Make way for this Spiced Christmas Cake which is sure to be a crowd pleaser. Here is what you’ll need:

  • 2 1/4 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 2 1/2 cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon ground giner
  • 1/2 teaspoon all spice
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 4 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup applesauce
  • mincemeat filling (optional)
  • powdered sugar to top (optional; ignore the white sugar in the photo. Imagine its powdered sugar since I noticed the mistake just now.)

First, measure out the flour into a large bowl. Then add the baking powder and soda, salt, brown sugar, and all the spices. Combine evenly.

Next in a separate bowl, beat all four eggs very well. Whenever I make a cake, I make sure that the eggs are as smooth as possible. This ensures a silky batter with an even rise; well, most of the time anyway. The last thing you want is to take a bite of cake and then find a bit of scrambled egg in your mouth!

Once the eggs are beaten, add the vanilla, vegetable oil, milk, and applesauce. In the states, its easy to find smooth applesauce, and sometimes several brands to choose from. In the UK, it’s more of an accompaniment with meat I believe, and there are jars of it especially around the holidays. I found a small jar at Tesco on Broadmead for 55p, made with chunks of bramley apple.

Add the wet ingredients to the bowl of flour and spices, and mix very well. If you have a mixer, use that, other wise get a whisk and combine everything well to form a smooth batter.

Line a round baking tin with baking paper, or butter and flour. Pour the batter into the tin and let it settle for a few minutes.

Heat your oven to 180 C / 350F and bake on the middle or low rack for ~35 minutes. I like to bake cakes a bit lower on the racks to avoid browning the cake top too soon.

Once it comes out of the oven, let it cool completely. Then you can really get creative to how you want to spruce it up! I cut it in half creating a top and bottom. Here you can add a layer of cream, or to make it truly festive, spread on a layer of mincemeat! Then top with a sprinkling of powdered sugar.

And there you have it, Spiced Christmas Cake! This cake is fragrant with seasonal spices and goes great with a cup of tea or coffee. I made this for my work Christmas lunch, and completely forgot to take a photo before we cut into it. This is because I waited til the morning of to put the finishing touches to the cake while I was making my breakfast and getting some slow cooker soup together in the crock pot. And I wonder why I get so tired at the end of the day! Anyway, although there are a lot of ingredients that go into this cake, its totally worth it! The cake is super moist and the flavour is just devine. Its what Christmas tastes like! I hope you get the chance to give this cake a try and that it becomes a part of your Christmas dessert recipes. Have a very Merry Christmas, and as always, thanks for reading and Happy Eating!

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Pumpkin Spice Balls

We are well into October, but here in Bristol, we are being spoiled by beautiful weather this weekend. Walking around was so perfect and it certainly doesn’t feel like winter will be here soon. Taking advantage of the nice weather, I went to Zero Green in Bedminster, one of Bristol’s many plastic free shops. You bring your own containers, weigh, fill, then weigh again. The oats, chia seeds, pumpkin seeds, date/raisins, and pulp are from this shop. They also feature almond, cashew, and oat mylk in glass bottles from a lovely company called O!Mylk. They often leave leftover nut pulp for customers to take for free! So I took about a cups worth and decided to make these Pumpkin Spice Balls. Here is what you’ll need:

  • 1 cup almond pulp (or desiccated almonds if you don’t have pulp)
  • 1/4 cup porridge oats
  • 1/4 cup raisins and/or chopped dates
  • 1 tablespoon chia seeds
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin spice
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon peanut butter (or nut butter of your choice)
  • 5-6 tablespoons puréed pumpkin
  • Pumpkin seeds to coat

Place the pulp, oats, dates & raisins, chia seeds, and pumpkin spice in a bowl. The pulp is moist, so I found it best to mix together with a fork, working all the ingredients together as much as possible.

Once mixed, it should look a bit crumbly, as seen above.

Next, add the honey, nut butter, and pumpkin. Really stir it through so that all dry ingredients are well incorporated. If the mixture is too dry and not holding, you can add a bit more pumpkin. If it’s turned out too wet, just sprinkle on a bit more oats.

After rolling into a ball, I squished pumpkin seeds onto the outside. You really have to press them in as they don’t stick easily. Alternatively, you can drizzle the balls in chocolate or icing, then put the seeds on.

And there you have it, Pumpkin Spice Balls! They were super easy to make and would be a fun activity for little ones. There are also a lot of ways to adapt this recipe to your liking. You can always use maple syrup or golden syrup instead of honey. And if you like them sweeter, add more honey and slightly less pumpkin to bind. I think toasted pecans or chocolate chips would work really well in these treats. However you make them, this is a great way to create a healthy snack without producing much waste.

Enjoy the sunshine while it lasts! Thanks for reading and Happy Eating!

Pumpkin Spice Scones

Happy October! Now it’s time for all things pumpkin, which really is one of my favourite things to eat. I’ve also noticed a lot more businesses are offering pumpkin spice flavored treats, which I plan on reviewing at a later date. Anyhow, on to these delicious scones. Here is what you’ll need:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon chia seeds
  • 1 cup puréed pumpkin
  • 1 tablespoon almond milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • Pumpkin seeds to top scones

First, combine all the dry ingredients. Mix very well, making sure you break up any brown sugar lumps.

Next, add the pumpkin, milk, and vanilla. Mix very well until the wet ingredients are fully incorporated, creating a sticky dough.

Place 8 even portions of the dough on your baking sheet. Top with pumpkin seeds. Since my seeds are raw, I like putting them on top so they end up with a nice, toasted flavor. Also, if any one likes my baking mat, I got it for £5 at Sainsbury’s.

Place into the oven at 350 F / 180 C for 15 minutes. Once done, take out the oven and let cool completely.

And there you have it, Pumpkin Scones that are vegan, egg free, dairy free, and delicious!

Even without butter, these are soft, chewy, and bursting with pumpkin spice flavor. They are easy to make as you just put all the ingredients into a bowl, mix it up, and bake. No fuss! And if you’re wondering where to find canned pumpkin, Sainsbury’s tends to have them in the American (junk) food aisle. Thanks for reading and Happy Eating!

Upside Down Plum Cake

The Bristol Half Marathon is tomorrow and I thought I’d bake up some pre-race fuel to use up some ripe plums. Not sure how the weather will turn out, but when all else fails, at least there’s cake. Here is what you’ll need:

For the plum topping:

  • 8-10 ripe plums
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar

For the cake batter:

  • 1 1/2 cups flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup almond milk (or any you like)
  • 1 teaspoon almond extract
  • 2 beaten eggs

First, wash and cut the plums as you like.

Next, mix the brown sugar and butter, spreading it on the bottom of your cake tin.

Then, neatly arrange the plums on top of the butter and brown sugar.

In a bowl, add the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, almond milk, and almond extract. Stir it a bit, then do the eggs.

Last, beat the eggs separately before adding them to the batter. If you have a mixer, use it! If not, just use a whisk to get a good batter. For the record, I don’t have a mixer, but the cakes still turn out alright.

Once mixed, pour the batter evenly into the tin, making sure it covers the fruit.

Heat your oven to 180 C / 350 F, and bake for 35 minutes.

And there you have it, Upside Down Plum Cake! This cake is good, like real good! Gooey, sticky, sweet, and part of your 5 a day? Heck yeah!

This is the perfect way to use up your ripe plums. The recipe also works well with damsons, peaches, and nectarines. And who doesn’t like a serving of fruit? Hopefully a slice of this cake will propel me to the finish line. And at the very least, lots of leftovers, yeah! If you happen to be near the Half Marathon route, come out and cheer us on – with the weather we’re expecting, we’ll need it! Thanks for reading and Happy Eating!

Easy Blackberry Jam

The weather is starting to turn, but we’re still having lots of sunny afternoons with cool breezes. And, there are still blackberries to be harvested. So, I thought I’d make some easy Blackberry jam with my last haul. It makes a small batch, which is approximately one jar. Here is what you’ll need:

  • 2 cups blackberries
  • 1 cup sugar
  • Juice from 1 lemon

After washing your blackberries very well, place in a small sauce pan with the sugar.

Next, grab a masher and spend several minutes smashing the heck out of those berries. You really want to get the juice flowing so that the berries become a liquid purée like mash up.

There will still be bits of berry, but as you can see above, it should have lots of juice. Place on the stove and set on high. I used mark 5.

Bring the berry mash to a boil, stirring it the entire time. By constantly stirring, you’ll ensure it does not burn. Once it boils for about 5 minutes, put on medium low and simmer until it thickens. You’ll know it’s ready when it coats the spoon.

Juice the lemon, and stir in the liquid while the berry mixture is still hot.

Make sure your jar is already prepared. It needs to be thoroughly cleaned and boiled to sterilise. While the liquid is still hot, spoon jam into the jar. It will firm up as it cools.

And there you have it, one batch of Easy Blackberry Jam! This is the perfect way to preserve the last of the summer fruit to enjoy into the cold winter months. Stir it in porridge, put it in yogurt, or enjoy on some toast! However you slice it, this jam is just too easy to pass up. Give it a try before the berries disappear. Thanks for reading and Happy Eating!

Wild Fruit Crumble

This cooler weather has been so nice and comfortable. It’s the perfect temperature for running and cycling, and for foraging wild fruit on the way.

I loaded up on these berries and apples during a bike ride, and the most obvious thing to make was a warm and filling crumble. Here is what you’ll need:

  • 2 cups blackberries
  • 3 small apples
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 1/2 cup porridge oats
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds
  • 1/4 cup raisins or sultanas
  • 1/3 cup almond milk

First wash the fruit very well, then peel and chop the apples into chunks. Put all the fruit into your baking dish.

Pour the sugar and flour over the fruit, and mix it around trying to coat the chunks as much as possible.

Next you will prepare the topping, which is essentially a bowl of porridge. Put the oats, cinnamon, almonds, raisins, and almond milk together. Let it sit for about 5 minutes so the oats absorb as much of the liquid as possible.

Spread the topping over the fruit. Make sure it’s as even as possible.

Place in the oven at 180 C / 350 F for 35 – 40 minutes, depending on your oven. It’s done when the fruit is soft and the topping is golden brown.

And there, you have it, Wild Fruit Crumble! You can pretty much use any fruit you want. Damson, blueberries, and red plums work well too! And the topping is on the healthy side compared to traditional crumble which often has a lot of butter and sugar. As I’m training for the Bristol Half Marathon, this is definitely a dessert I can get behind! And you can even have it for breakfast! It is part of your five a day and a lovely way to fuel your morning workout. Give this recipe a try and you can start by picking some wild fruit. Thanks for reading and Happy Eating!

Coconut Banana Cookies

Hello Bristol! Anyone else loving these cooler temperatures? I get the feeling that autumn is upon us and that means I can finally fire up the oven! So, as I’m training for the Bristol Half Marathon, I wanted to make these cookies which are great snacks packed with energy. Here is what you’ll need:

  • 2 ripe bananas
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla
  • 1 1/2 cups finely grated coconut
  • 1/4 cup nuts or seeds (I used pumpkin)
  • 1/4 raisins (or chocolate chips)

First, mash your bananas very well. The riper they are, the sweeter they’ll be, and the easier they will mash up.

At this point, add some vanilla, stirring it in thoroughly.

Next, add the coconut, pumpkin seeds, and raisins. I will add that although the pink bag of coconut says flour, it’s more like finely shredded coconut. I do have actual coconut flour which is much finer. I suppose you can use that as well, and if so, let me know how it turns out.

Spoon out the mixture onto a cookie sheet, flattening them a bit. Place them in an oven heated to 350 F / 180 C for 15 minutes. If you want a bit more browning on top, add another 3-5 minutes to that.

And there you have it, Coconut Banana Cookies! These were super easy to make, and start to finish, took just over 30 minutes or so. You can also customize these as you like once you have the banana, coconut, and vanilla base. I think chocolate chips and walnuts would be great together, as well as dates and almonds. However you bake them, this recipe is hard to mess up. Give these a try this weekend as the cooler weather rolls in. Thanks for reading and Happy Eating!

Apple Cider Caramel Cake

I know I’ve been a bit lax on the posts lately… I blame that on the cold and snow. So I decided to make a cake for Easter this past weekend using some cider I bought at The Cider Shop here in Bristol. It’s a bit time intensive, but well worth it in the end. Here is what you’ll need:

  • 2 cups almond flour
  • 3/4 cup coconut flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 mashed banana
  • 4 eggs
  • 1/4 cup any kind of milk (I used almond)
  • 1/4 cup melted coconut oil
  • 1 teaspoon almond essence

In a large bowl, combine your dry ingredients- almond flour, coconut flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder.

In a separate bowl, mash a ripe banana very well, until it becomes paste like.

In the wet ingredients bowl, add 4 beaten eggs, the almond milk, melted coconut oil and almond essence.

Combine the wet and dry ingredients, mixing very well. Go ahead and pour the batter into a lined round baking tin and bake for 35 minutes at 350 F /180 C.

Once baked, take the cake out of the tin and while it is cooling, you can make the caramel topping. Here is what you’ll need:

  • 1 cup of sweet apple cider
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup salted butter
  • Sliced almonds to top cake at the end

I picked up a bottle of Woodredding medium sweet cider at The Cider Shop while I was exploring the Wapping Wharf cargo shops the other week. This was lightly sparkling and not too dry, so very enjoyable to drink on its own. It’s also a sweet variety which is great to reduce when baking.

On a medium high heat, combine the butter, cider, and sugar. Melt everything down and stir, stir, stir. You really want to make sure to keep an eye on it, constantly stirring at this heat, and having the patience not to raise the temperature too much.

As the liquid and alcohol evaporate away, the mixture will thicken. I cooked it a little too long, but next time, I will stick to 20 minutes then reduce the heat for another 5 – 10.

Let the caramel cool only slightly, then pour over the cake, smoothing it evenly over the surface.

I was aiming for a caramel that wasn’t as thick so it would drip down the sides, but, you can’t have it all, eh? Top with sliced almonds and eat vigorously.

And there you have it, Apple Cider Caramel Cake! It may take some time to make, but is sooo worth it in the end! And although my kitchen smells like a pub from the evaporated cider alcohol, my tummy is very satisfied.

This is a great treat to make for garden parties or just to enjoy on your own as the weather gets warmer. It’s also a great way to showcase some of the wonderful cider the West Country has to offer. Pick your favourite sweet cider and have a go! Hope you all had a relaxing long weekend, and fear not, Spring is (probably) on the way! Thanks for reading and Happy Eating!

Rustic Galette topped with Single Gloucester Cheese

For last night’s dinner, I decided to make a galette topped with some of the single Gloucester cheese I bought at the Royal Three Counties show.

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On Saturday morning, I stopped off at the Gloucester Cattle Society tent where they had cheese, cuts of beef, and sizzling burgers for sale. I decided to try some single Gloucester cheese as I’ve never had it before and doesn’t seem to be as readily available as double Gloucester cheese.  I tried to find the difference between the two, and the website from the British Cheese Board sums it up nicely.  The distinction has changed throughout the decades, but now single Gloucester is only produced within the county, whereas double can be made and sold anywhere. There were a few varieties for purchase, but I decided on a small wedge from Jonathon Crump’s cheese which was unpasteurized and organic.

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I couldn’t find a website for them, but the label states they are located in Standish, Gloucestershire. I decided to incorporate this cheese into a rustic galette as it was creamy, but not too sharp which would compliment the bits of salty pancetta I would put on top.

First, I made the galette dough:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup butter, chilled
  • 1 egg yolk
  • dash of distilled malt vinegar
  • 5 tablespoons ice water

FullSizeRender (9)Mix together the all-purpose flour, wheat flour, and salt.  Incorporate the butter into the dough, mixing it with a pastry cutter or your hands until it becomes crumbly.  In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg yolk, vinegar, and water (it will be a bit frothy).  Add the liquid to the flour and knead until you have a smooth dough. You can add more ice water if necessary, a tablespoon at a time.  Separate the dough in half for two small galettes. You will roll it out before adding the filling, so you can cover the dough and chill in the fridge until its time to fill.

Next, I began preparing the filling.  The best thing about galettes is that they are so versatile.They don’t have to look pretty and can be filled with anything, sweet or savory, and are perfect for when you don’t feel like using a pie pan.  I decided to fill mine with pancetta (from Aldi), onions, mushrooms, and spinach.  First I fried up the half a package of pancetta until cooked, then set it aside, leaving the oil in the pan.  Then I sautéed the onions and mushrooms with a heaping spoon of chopped garlic.  This stage will produce a good amount of liquid from the veggies.  Too much liquid will give your galette a soggy bottom, so I reduced that to retain flavor.  I then turned off the stove, and added the chopped spinach which cooked on its own from the residual heat.

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I preheated the oven to 210 degrees celsius and spooned half of the filling onto the center of each piece of rolled out dough. Spread the filling, leaving about an inch of dough around the galette to fold.  It probably helps to put the rolled out dough on your parchment paper lined tray before you fill it, just sayin’.  You then want to carefully fold up the edges of the dough a little at a time.  The flattened dough doesn’t necessarily have to be perfectly round as it all gets folded up anyway.

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Next I grated the lovely single Gloucester cheese and smothered it over the top before putting the galettes into the oven for 20 minutes.


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The dough should be a golden brown, so a few more minutes may be necessary depending on what type of oven you have.  I have a fan oven here in England, and 20 minutes was sufficient for a gorgeous looking galette!

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I also picked up a bottle of apple juice at the Three Counties Show.  I don’t really drink juice, unless its orange juice accompanied by a shot of vodka.  However, I tried a sample of what I thought was cider and it turned out to be one of the most delicate tasting juices I’ve ever had. This juice comes from Once Upon a Tree located in Ledbury (HR8 2RG).  They produce a nice range of juice, cider, and perry.  This juice is made with the Discovery Apple, which is smooth and sweet, and not at all sharp and sour as some apple juices can be.  Their products are available online, at really great prices, so I’ll definitely be buying this again.  My meal was finished off by a punnet of Malvern strawberries bought before leaving the Three Counties show.

I’m heading to Cornwall this weekend to celebrate my two year anniversary and will be bringing along a bottle of wine also purchased at the show. Hopefully I’ll remember to do a quick post in between spending time at the beach.  I’m hoping to find some Cornish products to use for future recipes, but next week’s recipe will probably be something with cider!

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Thanks for reading and Happy Eating!

The Royal Three Counties Show

I had quite a day at the Royal Three Counties show yesterday and barely know where to begin.  Despite a rainy start, the grounds were packed with people buying, selling, showing, and shearing!

Showing some cattle
Showing some cattle
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One of the many sheep
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A bit of show jumping
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More horses hanging out

First off, the grounds covered lots of yardage with areas reserved for the horses, cattle, sheep, with pens to showcase each.  The main arena at the very north of the grounds featured the dressage, horse and carriage showings. The area adjacent to the south entrance featured a lot of the sheep and cattle showings, along with the sheep shearing competitions which was a highlight for this city girl! Seriously, shearing that wool is tough work, but these guys made it seem almost effortless as they worked on 8 sheep during the early stages of the competition. Can you imagine shearing a hundred or more in a day?

Sheep shearing semi- finals!
Sheep shearing semi- finals!

Anyhow, onto the food and drink, which were the things I was looking forward to the most.  However, I was so in the zone, that I forgot to capture and record some of the food I had eaten.  Halfway through my first scotch egg ever, I realized I should probably take some photos and write some things down.  So, today’s post will go over a few of the things I ate hot and ready.  A lot of the suppliers have an online presence, so if you see something you like, check them out and tell ‘em  you found them here, on Bristol is Home.

OK, so that scotch egg.  I love eggs and sausage and all things fried. However, since my first visit to England in the summer of 2002, which included exploring Scotland, can you believe I’ve never tried a scotch egg? Yeah, me neither. So when I saw The Handmade Scotch Egg Co Ltd  display, I had toIMG_0930 try one. The toughest part was choosing as they had tons of variations of the classics, some with spicy tones, and even one with whisky.  However, I decided to try the “Monty” which featured dry cured ham wrapped around the egg, which was then surround with free range pork.  Sorry if the pic isn’t too photo worthy; I was almost too busy devouring it before I realized I was supposed to be reporting on it too!  The Handmade Scotch Egg Co. can be found at two places: Egg’cetra (the first ever Scotch egg shop), 14 Friar St, Worcester, and The Nest (their headquarters), Hereford Rd, Ledbury.  You can also shop online at: handmadescotcheggs.co.uk, and check out their facebook page here.

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What I ate next isn’t English, per se.  However, when you consider the diverse multicultural fabric that comprises the UK, and that I went to school in Indiana where pierogis were served in the dining hall, I knew I had to try one of the Old Granary’s huge pierogis.  If you like pasties, then you’ll like this traditional Polish treat too.  These handheld parcels feature savory fillings encased in a yeast dough.  I chose the chilli beef, although to be honest, I could have easily eaten each one they had on offer.  They are located in Herefordshire (Marden, 10B Walkers Green, HR1 3DN) and also have a facebook page here.

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Next was my favorite of all the savories I tried: a good ol’ sausage roll straight from Cooper’s Gourmet Sausage Rolls (link) in Shropshire.  These sausage rolls were stuffed with generous heapings of  tasty meat and were such a great price (2 pounds each at the show) that I had to try two.  The Peri Peri was spicy with the perfect level of kick, and the Hickory Smoked BBQ was so flavorful, that if you closed your eyes, you’d swear you just grabbed it off a table in Texas! They really were that good, and I’m kicking myself for not buying more to take home.  They currently deliver to tons of shops and delis, so check them out online to see if you can find some near where you are: www.coopers-sausage-rolls.co.uk and don’t forget to check out their facebook page here.

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To end today’s post, will be some chocolate I bought with the loose change I had left in my pocket.  I wanted to focus on local flavors, so the Herefordshire Gooseberry Elderflower and the Herefordshire Gwatkin Cider flavors from La Fleur de Chocolat caught my eye.  The cider truffle had a smooth filling inside that featured a hint of sharpness you might find in a good cider surrounded by good quality chocolate.

My FullSizeRender (4)favorite however, was the white chocolate truffle, as the gooseberry elderflower goodness inside was just heavenly.  It was tart, yet creamy and silky.  Infact, I would have bought a jar of just the filling if it was offered.  Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like these two flavors are available online (although other gorgeous flavors are), so if you see them at a show, buy some and you won’t regret it. Located in Herefordshire (HR2 9BS), they also feature chocolate making and desert classes throughout the year. Check out their website at: www.lafleurdechocolat.co.uk

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Again, this is just a small sample of what I ate.  This show was such a great day out, that I’m already planning a return for their Autumn festival later on in the year.

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I also brought these goodies home which I will be cooking with for my next few posts. Stay tuned…

Thanks for reading and Happy Eating!